Questions About Counselling Methods, with Damien Haigh

Telephone 01924 332 154 or 07504 744 086, or e-mail info@damienhaigh.co.uk

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What does counselling involve?

Counselling can help you deal with a wide range of problems or emotional difficulties, with the aim of improving your emotional well-being, or developing your potential as a person. You are encouraged to talk about any difficult or troubling feelings you are having, and given time to make sense of your life experiences.

Counsellors do not judge, blame or criticise people, nor advise clients what to do. Instead, they listen carefully and help you to explore conflicting feelings or mixed-up emotions, helping you resolve your problems, or understand yourself better.

Sometimes, discussing past experiences helps you to uncover ‘hidden’ problems which stop you from living life to the full in the present, or from relating well to others.

What type of counselling do you offer?

I offer one-to-one counselling, for men and women aged 18 and over, on a once-weekly basis.

I am a fully-qualified therapeutic counsellor, offering you a safe and confidential space to talk about any emotional difficulties or problems in your life. I am trained to help you explore your concerns in a variety of ways which suit individual clients and/or their particular problems.

What theoretical model of counselling are you trained in?

I use a relational integrative model of counselling. This is a flexible approach which allows me to adapt my way of working to suit the unique needs of different clients.

This relational model integrates ideas from two major ‘schools’ of counselling: the person-centred approach and psychodynamics.

Person-centred theory takes the view that human beings have vast resources for developing their potential and understanding themselves, and this process will take place if the therapist provides a facilitative climate of deep understanding and acceptance of the client’s feelings. As clients experience the therapist’s understanding and acceptance, they come over time to understand and accept themselves more, allowing them more freedom to make the right life decisions for themselves. Therapists also relate genuinely to clients, and over time clients find it easier to be genuine in their relationships with others.

The model also integrates psychodynamic theory, which helps us to understand how past events or relationships can impact upon our present life, and deepen insight into the way we behave. This model puts forward the idea that we have repeating relational patterns which we learnt at an earlier stage of our life, and which we transfer maladaptively onto our current relationships. Becoming more self-aware of these patterns means that we can change them and find more healthy ways of relating to others.

I have also trained in cognitive-behavioural techniques, and can integrate these into my approach in order to help clients understand how their negative thinking patterns might affect their mood.

You can find further information about theoretical models on the BACP’s “It’s Good to Talk” website www.itsgoodtotalk.org.uk/what-is-therapy/types-of-therapy (this will open in a new tab or new window on your browser).

Will I be told what to do or advised by my counsellor?

I work in a way that encourages you to think for yourself and develop your potential, so that you can make your own decisions about the best way forward in dealing with any difficulties you may have. I feel that this is more empowering for clients in the longer-term.

Therefore, I hope that we will agree that any changes, decisions or actions you may make during or after our work together are ones for which you take responsibility.

What standards of behaviour are expected of clients in counselling?

You can express strong feelings, even anger, in counselling, and I will not judge you if you use strong words. However, I may have to end our counselling work together if you become so angry that you hurt me or damage my property.

Counselling also requires both the counsellor and client to be able to think clearly, so we will agree that we cannot work together if you come to a session under the influence of alcohol or recreational drugs.

Will counselling be difficult for me?

Doing counselling can sometimes be upsetting. As clients gain a deeper understanding of the depth of their problems, they even sometimes feel worse before they start to feel better. However, in the long run, counselling can help you to work through your confusion or pain. You can then make changes to your life, by finding new or better ways of dealing with difficult situations or behaviour, or by coming to terms with things that you cannot change.

Are you trained to work with cultural differences?

I appreciate that a personís gender, race, class or sexual orientation, and other aspects of their identity or cultural background, can shape their view of their life. I am respectful of individual difference and trained to support clients in exploring the impact of this.


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Posted: 27 September 2016.

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Damien is a registered, accredited member (number 052900) of the
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E-mail:
info@damienhaigh.co.uk

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E-mail:
info@damienhaigh.co.uk

To make an appointment, please telephone
01924 332 154
(office)
or
07504 744 086
(mobile/text)

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